Fix ASP.NET problems FAST with Troubleshooting Tasks!

Announcing Troubleshooting Tasks!

Tasks are simple, step-by-step wizards to help you fixing ASP.NET problems.

Our users wanted a simpler way to solve common problems without finding them in the LeanSentry dashboard. And that’s exactly what we built.

Here is a video of using the “Fix slow requests” troubleshooting task to quickly troubleshoot slow page loads:

This also leverages the new slow operation tracking feature we announced last week, which tells you what causes your slow requests by tracking the operations that slow them down.

We already have tasks for:

  1. Fix your top errors
  2. Troubleshoot slow requests

More tasks are coming over the next couple weeks.  Do you have a suggestion for a task you’d like to see? Let us know!

Best,

The LeanSentry Team

 

 

Profiler vs. Debugger? Best way to debug slow ASP.NET page loads

Got slow ASP.NET page loads in your application? Should you use the a profiler or a debugger to troubleshoot them?

We put together an infographic to help you decide.

It also mentions a third approach using ETW tracing, which is what we used for LeanSentry’s new slow operation tracking feature … and the benefits it has over traditional debuggers or profilers.


Infographic: Should you use a Profiler or a Debugger to fix slow ASP.NET page loads?

Using high-speed ETW tracing for 100% slow operation coverage

We just announced our new slow operation tracking feature, which uses ETW tracing to give a complete coverage of slow operations.  It combines a lightweight tracing library, intelligent filtering, and very fast ETW tracing, and an awesome report in the LeanSentry dashboard.

The result: a much better way to track what causes slow page loads in ASP.NET applications than the traditional profiling or debugging approach.

  • Unlike a profiler, we can trace every single slow operation, as well as its stacktrace and custom application variables, without losing it to averaging.
  • Unlike a debugger, we can get continuous coverage of all your requests, not just the ones you happened to catch when you were debugging.
  • Unlike both, its fast enough for 24/7 monitoring in production and gives 100% coverage of all your slow requests.

If you think “OMG that must be so slow” when you hear tracing, think again.  ETW tracing is pretty much on all the time in your applications, and is tons faster then any other custom-built tracing mechanism you may already have going on. In fact, most apps can turn on ETW tracing and probably never realize its there.

Most importantly, you decide which operations to trace! You can add more or fewer trackers to your code to get more resolution.

Of course, LeanSentry does some extra stuff under the covers to make the most of this.  We know what makes a request slow (you configure per-URL response time thresholds), automatically determine which operations are slow so we don’t trace everything, and provide a near-realtime report to you.

More resources

  • Learn more about LeanSentry’s new operation tracking feature  – based on the ETW tracing approach the infographic mentions. Check out the demo video here!
  • Try slow operation tracking in your own apps when you get a LeanSentry trial account.

New pricing announced!

More big news today … we just announced our new pricing!

The new pricing is a result of a user survey we conducted, and the lessons we learned from it.

A big thank you to everyone who participated in the survey and shared their feedback with us.

New plans!

The new plans make LeanSentry’s automatic diagnostics more accessible, by making them available in our new Standard plan.

We also introduced our new Professional plan, which provides users with power features for tuning and troubleshooting their apps. This plan offers features like advanced diagnostics (e.g. our memory diagnostic), and the ability to search all of LeanSentry’s data and create a custom investigation with it.

The new Professional plan will enhance anyone’s ability to provide professional level application support, without spending hours analyzing server data or even having to log into the server!

We also kept an affordable Lite plan, which allows you to get many of LeanSentry’s most popular features a lower price. We include all of our basic monitoring, popular error tracking, and basic alerts at this level.

  • Have you wanted to use LeanSentry diagnostics in your apps but couldn’t afford it before? Check out the new Standard plan.
  • Are you an existing user? Not to worry, we upgraded your account to the new Standard or Professional plan automatically at no charge. Thanks for being with us!

Best,

The LeanSentry Team

Fix IIS hangs – troubleshooting guide!

IIS hangs troubleshooting guide

We’ve been working hard on LeanSentry’s automatic diagnostics, to make sure it can detect and diagnose most production issues for you.

If you are not using LeanSentry yet, that means you are still doing troubleshooting by hand. To help, Mike recently created the LeanSentry Production troubleshooting course, an email course based with his own debugging techniques.

Today, we published an online guide for the course’s most popular troubleshooting topic, how to troubleshoot IIS website hangs.

Fix IIS hangs

The guide gives practical tips on how to isolate, and diagnose the hang so you can fix it. All you’ll need is the standard Microsoft tools and some time.

Here is a sneak peak:

Fix IIS hangs - table of contents

Want more IIS & ASP.NET troubleshooting guides?

If we get good feedback on the guide, we plan to turn the rest of the class into online guides for everyone to use.

It helps us raise our profile, and its an awesome way for us to contribute to the IIS & ASP.NET community.

So, go check out the “Fix IIS hangs” guide, share it, and leave your feedback on Mike’s blog!

Best,

The LeanSentry team

Let’s fix production troubleshooting!

Running production web applications is a constant struggle. Slow page loads, hangs, crashes, memory leaks.

Even when you think you are clear, they come back anytime there is a code change, new feature, new server environment, or even a change in traffic.

You can have the best monitoring system in place, but when the red light goes off … YOU still have to diagnose and fix the problem.

Conveniently, that’s where your monitoring tool politely bows out and lets you do the hard work.

And where many IT and devops teams end up spending most of their time.

At LeanSentry, we set out to fix the production troubleshooting process.

To do it, we had to solve the problem of both tools AND expertise.

Tools. The tools we use fall into two categories: production monitoring tools (perfmon, logparser, SCOM, third parties), and developer analysis tools (debuggers, profilers). The monitoring tools detect but cant diagnose problems. When you finally bring in the heavy developer tools to solve the problem, its already long gone. You can’t profile a process that doesn’t have high CPU anymore … or debug a hang that’s no longer there. The alternative: to run your process under 24/7 profiling and debugger in anticipation of possible problems is just not acceptable.

Expertise. Even if you somehow got all the data, making sense of it can be very difficult. If you’ve ever done a production hang or memory leak investigation, you know exactly how much work and time it takes to get to the bottom of things.

Of course, you could go out and hire an troubleshooting expert. Get security access for them.  Spend hours explaining your application to them.  Pay them a lot of money. Then, they’ll set up the same debugging tools on your server, wait for the issue to reproduce, and maybe get you the answer several weeks later.

We’ve been doing this kind of troubleshooting for years.

But to make it accessible to everyone who runs Microsoft web apps, we needed to do it automatically, with low overhead, and without requiring the user to be an IIS expert.

Here was our blueprint:

  1. Lightweight 24/7 monitoring to always catch problems the first time. We use performance counters, IIS logs, and ETW events to watch for problems. These protocols have near-zero overhead on the server, and cannot affect the application because they completely external.
  2. Automatically detect problems like hangs or memory leaks. These are the tricks of the trade: rules based on Microsoft guidelines and our own troubleshooting techniques. Our hang diagnostic uses over 12 different rules to reliably detect a hang given various pieces of lightweight monitoring data.
  3. Automatically analyze the problem so you don’t have to. When the problem is detected, we’ll analyze it immediately and attempt to determine the root cause. This also works to eliminate the knowledge gap: software can do the complex analysis and present the facts simply so that operations teams can easily act or transition the resolution to the developer.To do the analysis, we can leverage multiple data sources at our disposal: including IIS logs, ETW events, profiling data, and sometimes the debugger. We’ve been doing this kind of troubleshooting for years, so this was just a matter of automating it.Best of all, this analysis has low impact because a) it only takes place when there is already a problem and b) usually lasts just a few seconds and always keeps the application running.
  4. Alert you about the problem, and show you the solution. This is the best part. Instead of having to spend days hunting and analyzing the problem, you get a shrink-wrapped report with a pretty bow on it (bow not included). This is the difference between taking weeks to diagnose a problem every time, or literally minutes.

LeanSentry can now diagnose: website hangs, ASP.NET memory leaks, IIS application pool crashes, and more

Getting these kind of diagnostics to work right for everyone takes time. We are now 7 months after our launch in February, and here are the kinds of things we can diagnose:

  1. Hangs and slow page loads. We’ll detect IIS website hangs or very slow page loads, and tell you when you have concurrency misconfiguration problems or thread pool exhaustion. Down to the line of code thats causing the hang. LeanSentry automatically diagnoses website hangs and slow page loads ... down to queueing, threadpool exhaustion, misconfiguration, and even the line of application code.Learn more about the hang diagnostic →
  2. ASP.NET memory leaks. We’ll detect memory leaks and out of memory problems, and give you a complete memory analysis to tell you what caused it. LeanSentry automatically detects ASP.NET memory leaks in production,  and diagnoses their root causes so you can start working on the fix. Learn more about the ASP.NET memory leak diagnostic →
  3. IIS and ASP.NET errors, IIS application pool crashes and recycles, and more.
    There is too many to list here, but you can see many of them in action in our demo application.

Our ultimate goal was to change the way people deal with application problems in production.

To break the monitor -> struggle -> reproduce -> investigate cycle.

It looks like we are finally doing it. To check out our new diagnostics and how they work, go to www.leansentry.com. While there, set up a free trial account and never look back.

Everything you ever wanted to know about ASP.NET request queueing

LeanSentry detects ASP.NET queueing when diagnosing an IIS/ASP.NET hang

Did you know there are 5 places where ASP.NET requests can become queued on an IIS server?

Not all these queues are documented, and it can be very difficult to tell when and where requests are queued.

As part of LeanSentry’s automatic hang detection and troubleshooting, we had to figure out the IIS/ASP.NET request queueing behavior. So, we wanted to share the knowledge with everyone so you can properly track down queued requests.

Read on to learn all about these queues, how to tell when requests are queued, and how to identify the exact requests that are actually queued!

(UPDATE: Want to learn how to troubleshoot common ASP.NET issues like hangs, high CPU, etc?
Take our new LeanSentry Production Troubleshooting course. Its a free 5-7 email course that teaches the production troubleshooting techniques we’ve been using for years.)

The details on IIS and ASP.NET queues

When a request is received by your IIS server, here are all the queues it must clear in order to be processed:

1. HTTP.SYS: Application pool queue

Requests are always first queued here, for the IIS worker process to dequeue.

Behavior: Requests begin to accumulate when IIS falls behind in dequeueing requests. The limit is set by the application pool’s configured queueLength attribute, and defaults to 1000. When limit is reached, HTTP.SYS returns 503 Service Unavailable.

Monitor: “Http Service Request QueuesCurrentQueueSize” performance counter

2. IIS worker process: completion port

The dequeued requests queue up here, waiting for IIS i/o threads to pick them up.

Behavior: There is usually up to 20 possible requests queued here, and they are dispatched up to N at a time (where N = number of processor cores).

Monitor: This is an undocumented queue, with no available reporting.

3. ASP.NET: CLR threadpool queue

ASP.NET queues all incoming requests to the CLR threadpool.

Behavior: If all CLR threads are busy, requests can queue up here up to the configured processModel/requestQueueLimit. When there are more than this many total requests (executing + queued), ASP.NET returns 503 Service Unavailable.

NOTE: Any async modules also re-post requests to the CLR threadpool, so requests can become “re-queued” again later in the request processing.

Monitor: “ASP.NET v4.0.30319Requests Queued” performance counter

NOTE: This counter is global for the entire server, there is no way to tell which website/apppool has queued requests. It also does not work correctly in Integrated mode for .NET 2.0/3.5.

4. ASP.NET: Integrated mode global queue

In Integrated mode, ASP.NET will queue all incoming requests after the configured concurrency limit is reached.

Behavior: Concurrency limit is set by the MaxConcurrentRequestsPerCPU registry key or applicationPool/maxConcurrentRequestsPerCPU attribute (Defaults to 12 on .NET 2.0/3.5, and 5000 on .NET 4.0+) and MaxConcurrentThreadsPerCPU registry key or the applicationPool/MaxConcurrentThreadsPerCPU attribute (defaults to 0, disabled).

Monitor: “ASP.NET v4.0.30319Requests Queued” performance counter

5. ASP.NET: Classic mode application queue

In Classic mode, ASP.NET will queue all incoming requests to the per-application queue when there are not enough threads.

Behavior: The threads available for request processing are determined by available threads in the CLR thread pool, minus the reserved threads set by the httpRuntime/minFreeThreads and httpRuntime/minFreeLocalThreads attributes.

NOTE: This queue has poor performance, and does not guarantee FIFO in application pools with multiple applications (because threads are shared between multiple apps, so a single app can starve the other applications of available threads).

Monitor: “ASP.NET ApplicationsRequests in Application Queue” performance counter, with instances per application.

How to tell which requests are queued

Ok, so we can now tell whether requests are queued, but how we can tell which requests are queued vs. which requests are processing?

This helps us identify which requests are causing blocking in the system (and possibly causing a hang), vs. the requests that are simply queued as a result.

Well, we can’t tell which requests are queued in queues 1 & 2, because they have not yet been picked up by IIS. We also cant tell which requests are queued in the Classic mode per-application queue. Lucky for us, most queueing for ASP.NET apps in Integrated mode (default) happens in queue #3 and #4. And while we can’t always determine his 100%, there is a heuristic that can help us separated queued from processing requests 90% of the time. In my experience, that has been good enough!

Here is the trick:

1. Snapshot the currently executing requests

> %windir%system32inetsrvappcmd list requests /elapsed:1000

You’ll get a list like this:

// hanging!
REQUEST "7000000780000548" (url:GET /test.aspx, time:30465 msec, client:localhost, stage:ExecuteRequestHandler, module:ManagedPipelineHandler)
REQUEST "f200000280000777" (url:GET /test.aspx, time:29071 msec, client:localhost, stage:ExecuteRequestHandler, module:ManagedPipelineHandler)
…
// queued!
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /, time:1279 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "7500020080000648" (url:GET /login, time:764 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)

2. Use this rule to identify the queued requests:

A group of requests to an Integrated pipeline ASP.NET app are queued if they are:

  1. Processing in an ASP.NET module
  2. There are no other requests to the same app in an ASP.NET module in an earlier pipeline stage
  3. There are no other requests to the same app in a different ASP.NET module/stage with higher avg. latency.

Basically, this takes advantage of the fact that the first ASP.NET module in the request processing pipeline will cause ASP.NET to queue the request, showing it as processing in that module in the executing request list. The request at the front of the list have been executing the longest, which means they are NOT queued (queueing is FIFO).

Practically, this just means that the last block of requests in the list the same ASP.NET module/stage are queued requests. Think about it. From experience, these usually show as blocks of:

REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /, time:8076 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /login, time:5601 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /, time:5200 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /test.aspx, time:3209 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /test.aspx, time:1690 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)
REQUEST "6f00000780000567" (url:GET /, time:1279 msec, client:localhost, stage:AuthenticateRequest, module:WindowsAuthentication)

Simply because for most ASP.NET apps, WindowsAuthentication is the first ASP.NET module to process the request in the AuthenticateRequest stage. If you have a custom module or global.asax processing BeginRequest, expect to see that.

We hope this will help you make sense of queued requests when troubleshooting slow or hung ASP.NET requests.

To learn more about LeanSentry’s automatic hang detection and troubleshooting, check out The holy grail: Automatically diagnose IIS & ASP.NET website hangs.

Best,
The LeanSentry Team

The 4 server logs you NEED to know to fix any IIS / ASP.NET error

Learn to use the IIS, HTTP.SYS, and ASP.NET error logs

When you investigate IIS or ASP.NET errors in production, does IIS sometimes feel like a black box?

Learn to use these 4 server logs, and you will always find the error you are looking for.

Its gotta be here somewhere

Finding the error is actually fairly straightforward once you know where to look. Most of the time, the error will be in one of these 4 logfiles by default:

1. First stop: the IIS log

The website’s IIS log will contain an entry for every request to the site. This log is typically located in c:inetpublogsLogFilesW3SVC[SITEID]. For each logged request, the log includes the URL, querystring, and the response status and substatus codes that describe the error:

2013-06-16 03:39:19 ::1 GET /test.aspx mincase=80 80 - ::1 - 500 16 0 3173

Tip: Notice the 500 16 0? These are the HTTP response status code, the IIS substatus code, and the win32 error code. You can almost always map the status and substatus code to an error condition listed in IIS7 HTTP error codes. You can also look up the win32 error code via winerror.h.

Is the substatus code 0, esp. 500.0? Then its most likely an application error i.e. ASP.NET, ASP, PHP, etc.

2. Nothing in the IIS log? Check the HTTPERR log

Sometimes, the request will not listed in the IIS log. First make sure that IIS logs are enabled for the website.

In a small percentage of cases, the request may have been rejected by HTTP.SYS before it even made it to an IIS worker process. This generally happens if the request violated the HTTP protocol (client saw HTTP 400: Bad Request) or there was a WAS/the application pool failure (client saw HTTP 503: Service Unavailable).

In this case, you will find the error in the HTTPERR logs, located in c:windowssystem32LogFilesHTTPERR:

2011-01-11 13:08:22 192.168.1.75 52623 192.168.1.124 2869 HTTP/1.1 NOTIFY /upnp/eventing/pfyehnxzvy - - Connection_Abandoned_By_ReqQueue

Tip: See the Connection_Abandoned_By_ReqQueue? HTTP.SYS is even better than IIS at telling you exactly why the error happened. See HTTP.SYS error codes for the exact cause.

3. ASP.NET exceptions: the Application EventLog

If the request is to an ASP.NET application, and the error was a 500.0, its most likely an unhandled ASP.NET exception. To find it, go to the Application EventLog and look for Warning events from the ASP.NET 4.0.30319.0 or applicable version:

ASP.NET exception in Application EventLog

Tip: ASP.NET Health Monitoring will log all errors to the Application EventLog by default. Except 404s. Also, it will only log up to 1 exception per minute. And logging is broken in ASP.NET MVC apps (sigh). Not to worry, here is a way to fix to reliably log ASP.NET exceptions.

4. Hard-to-catch errors: the Failed Request Trace (FRT) log

Can’t seem to catch the error? It it gone from the log before you can get to it? Then you need the IIS Failed Request Trace feature. This will let you configure a rule to capture a detailed request trace for a specific URL, status code, or time elapsed. Learn how to set up Failed Request Tracing to capture IIS errors.

Get ahead of the error game

If you are reacting to user error reports, you are already behind the 8-ball. The reality is, majority of production errors go unreported, because users are reluctant to speak up when they hit problems on your site. Given the short attention spans and low patience these days, they are way more likely to stop using your site instead. By the time you find out you have errors, the damage has already been done.

The only way to really win this game is to get proactive, and continually monitor all errors in your application so you can triage/fix the ones you consider important … BEFORE users begin to notice. If this sounds hard, it doesn’t have to be – esp. if you use LeanSentry’s error monitoring. Give it a try and never worry about hunting for errors again.

Crack down on 404 errors in IIS & ASP .NET apps

Crack down on 404 Not Found errors

404 Not Found is the most common error for most production web applications. So, its all too easy to start ignoring them after a while.

After all, you can’t do anything about pages that don’t exist in your site, right?

WRONG. Turns out, 404 errors often signal real production problems that CAN and SHOULD be fixed.

Problems like:

  • Broken links to your site that are causing you to lose potential sales or leads
  • Botched deployment / code changes that prevent your users from using your site correctly
  • Hacking activity that is wasting significant processing resources on your server

Read on to learn about the 4 common classes of 404 Not Found errors and what you should do to find and fix them.

LeanSentry tracks every single IIS and ASP.NET error for thousands of websites, and 404 Not Found is always at the top of the list. In fact, being able to ignore 404 errors has been a top LeanSentry feature request.

We’ve done a lot of work to help people track and fix production errors: grouping related errors, highlighting important errors, and letting the user quickly filter down to the errors they care about. While we dont advocate ignoring errors outright, we are also adding a feature to let you prioritize/hide specific errors for an app or just for a specific server / url.

The 4 classes of 404 errors you probably want to fix

Here are 4 key classes of 404 Not Found errors that require further attention, and how you can fix them:

1. Broken links to your site

Broken links to your site cause you to lose valuable leads, and frustrate your users. In some cases, bad links from major referral sources can cause you to lose a large percentage of your traffic.

How to find it

Look for 404 errors that request URLs that appear to “belong” to your site, e.g. following your site’s URL hierarchy or mispelling known versions of your urls.

How to fix it

Break the 404 errors by URL, and by HTTP Referer. You should be able to identify groups of specific content and referring sites that have the broken links.

NOTE: You need to turn on “Referer” field in your IIS logs to do this. It is unfortunately NOT enabled by default.

If the referrer is your own site, you can fix your own links. If the referrer is a third party site, you can contact them to get their links fixed.

2. Missing content, due to bad deployment or site changes

Bad deployments of your site content can cause some of your important content to become unavailable. Site changes often cause the same problem, esp. when URL rewriting or dynamic routing is involved.

How to find it

Look for 404 errors for URLs that previously worked.

How to fix it

You’ll need to diagnose the cause of the 404 error. This can be hard, since there can be many IIS and ASP.NET problems that lead to 404s (we’ll write another blog post about how to diagnose 404s comprehensively). Here are the top things to check:

1. Try to reproduce the 404 not found error yourself. Request the URL, if it returns a 404, great! You can now troubleshoot the error to figure out why. Be sure to use the detailed error page to confirm what physical file is being requested, and make sure it actually exists on the server.

2. Set up Failed Request Tracing to capture the 404 error trace. In the resulting traces, you should have all the details you need – the requested URL, phsysical resource it mapped to, the associated handler, and the error details.

3. Server routing errors

The server routing errors are becoming a more common problem, since many IIS/ASP.NET applications use SEO-friendly extensionless URLs, and code-determined routing (like ASP.NET MVC routing). A common time for these is a new code deployment or deployed to a new server, which can break both the configuration needed for routing and the code routing rules.

The process for finding and fixing this is similar to #2. However, a more detailed investigation may be required to understand why the routes are not working. The Failed Request Trace of the request may be a good start since it can trace URL Rewriter rule matching, and handler mapping done as part of routing. Also see this post for debugging ASP.NET MVC routing problems.

4. Hacking attempts

Many 404 errors are the result of hacking or bots scanning your website for vulnerabilities. I am sure everyone with a production website has seen the ubiquitous requests to “php_myadmin” even if they don’t have any PHP content.

You may want to dismiss these errors as “nothing you can do”. However, consider the following before moving on:

1. Requests to missing content can add significant processing overhead to your server. For example, they can cause worker processes to be started and ASP.NET applications to be loaded into memory / performing expensive initialization (this can be a big problem for servers that host many inactive applications).

2. Hacker requests failing with 404 not found errors may be a precursor to successful hacking attempts. You may want to stop them before its too late.

How to find it

Break down your 404 errors by URL, and look for URLs that do not appear to be a legitimate part of your application. Specifically, look for URLs that have never been successfully requested.

Then, break down the 404 errors by client IP, by HTTP referer, and by User Agent. You will often be able to spot traffic from specific clients, or specific user agents, and this traffic will almost never have the HTTP referer set (be careful with jumping to conclusons if you dont have HTTP referer logging enabled).

How to fix it

To eliminate the impact of the traffic on your server, and to prevent hacking attempts, block the traffic you identify as malicious. Here are the top ideas:

1. Deny access to folders with authorization rules.

    <location path="wp-cron.php">
        <system.webServer>
            <security>
                <authorization>
                    <clear />
                    <add accessType="Deny" users="*" />
                </authorization>
            </security>
        </system.webServer>
     </location>

2. Implement IP blocking. You can use the IIS IP Restrictions feature, or the new Dynamic IP Restrictions feature.

Be proactive about monitoring and fixing errors

The best way to keep your website healthy is to watch the errors you have in production. Any time you see an increase in errors, or an increase in a specific error, you should investigate to see if there is a problem that can be fixed. By contrast, not watching errors or hoping that they will go away is a quick way to lose sales and frustrate your users.

Users don’t complain, they just leave. This was a lesson we learned early on after launching LeanSentry. After our initial launch, we had a ton of errors due to load problems with our backend. Once in a while, a user complained about the errors, and we fixed them.

However, eventually we realized that many users were just getting frustrated and leaving the site, without ever telling us about it.

So, we implemented a proactive strategy where we watched every single error, and followed up with every user that ever hit one. This helped us understand the true scale of the problems, fix them, and make sure that we stopped frustrated users from leaving.

LeanSentry is one great way to keep tabs on production errors in your IIS/ASP.NET applications. It tracks every single error, and groups related errors to give you an accurate history of how often the error happens.

What’s more, LeanSentry also solves the problem of troubleshooting the error, by capturing all the details you or your developers need to fix the error. Including ASP.NET exception callstacks, detailed request traces, and more.

LeanSentry tracks down all 404 errors, and walks you through the troubleshooting steps to fix them
LeanSentry tracks down all 404 errors, and walks you through the troubleshooting steps to fix them.

To see how LeanSentry error tracking helps you get a handle on production errors, pop over to www.leansentry.com and check out the live demo! Then set up the free trial and never look back.

LeanSentry: TechEd 2013 is done!

Last week, we attended TechEd 2013 in New Orleans, and showed off LeanSentry to a crowd of Microsoft IT folks and developers. The reception was awesome! It took us a week to recover after the conference, but here is the wrapup.

Biggest take-away: everyone who runs Microsoft web apps wanted a tool like LeanSentry.

IT operation engineers, administrators, and developers all felt the pain of production troubleshooting, and wanted something that can help them diagnose production problems faster.

We spoke to hundreds of people, and asked almost everyone whether they’ve ever had to troubleshot a website hang or crash in production. Most of the time, the answer was “yes”.

We then asked, did you enjoy it? 100% of the time, the answer was “Hell no”! People told us dozens of stories of trying to catch a hang in production, and how long it took to figure out the root cause, even when Microsoft support was involved.

Then we got to hear the classic story of finger-pointing between the IT administrator that runs the production environment, and the developers that build the application. Often, the operations team didn’t have enough evidence to convince the developer that the issue was in their code … And the developer didn’t have enough information from production to reproduce the issue in the test environment.

We then showed LeanSentry’s automatic IIS/ASPNET hang diagnostics, which automatically detects hangs and instantly identifies their root cause, including blocking IIS modules, CLR threadpool exhaustion, or application code. People loved it!

The highlights

The feedback we got was pretty consistent. Everyone’s favorite things were:

1. Automatically diagnosing IIS and ASP.NET problems in production. Many people couldn’t believe that we do this at first. Many times we had to explain our Windows Server background and that Microsoft web platform development is all we do. Of course, seeing the hang diagnostic demo also helped.

2. Lightweight monitoring without profilers. IT administrators really appreciated the fact that LeanSentry uses lightweight Windows protocols like Performance counters and IIS logs to monitor the server, instead of loading application profilers. Many said “we dont want the performance monitoring tool to become the performance problem”, as we often hear from users of profiler based tools.

Many also loved how LeanSentry can be sandboxed to a separate VM, and monitor the production servers without installing anything on them. No reboots, iisresets, etc.

3. Making everything simpler. IT managers that handled web operations loved how simple the LeanSentry dashboard was, and how it was very easy to see all the requests, errors, and performance data in one place. Developers also loved aggregating the errors across Windows Server, IIS, and ASP.NET and getting all the details needed to troubleshoot the error. We heard a lot of complaints about how complicated SCOM was, and how LeanSentry dashboard was the “anti-SCOM”. The consensus was that LeanSentry complements environments that use SCOM, by providing a much simpler view to track problems and get the details to resolve them.

4. Working directly with the developer team. People loved talking directly with the founders and the developer team. Many were used to dealing with company sales people at the other booths. We loved showing everyone the Olark chat box on our site, where you can talk directly to the dev team anytime.

Top questions

The top questions people asked were:

1. How do you diagnose hangs in a lightweight way? We explained our multi-stage process for diagnosing hangs that insures lightweight monitoring, and still provides debug-level resolution for hangs. We use similar approaches for diagnosing other problems, where we first detect many potential symptoms of a problem using lightweight monitoring like performance counters, and only perform the intensive diagnostic once we know the problem already exists.

2. How is LeanSentry different from SCOM/AviCode/New Relic? In many ways! We put together a page to explain what makes LeanSentry different.

3. Can I host LeanSentry in my environment? You can’t just yet, but you will be able to later this year! We now have a beta program for people who want to help us do this. Email us for more info!

The goodies: TechEd discount, LeanSentry Robot t-shirts

For everyone who came to talk to with at TechEd, we are offering a special TechEd discount for our “Full service” plan. This is a limited time discount, so email us for details if you are looking to activate your account this month.

Also, we had a huge level of interest in the LeanSentry t-shirts. Because of this, we ran out early on the first day. If you didnt get a shirt, be sure to email us and we’ll put you on the list to get one!

Thanks and more

Thanks to everyone who came out to support us, and who talked to us at TechEd! We had a great time thanks to you, and really appreciate your support.

If you talked to us at TechEd, be sure to reach out over the next couple weeks to get the discount. You can also schedule a deep-dive demo with us to see how LeanSentry can improve your production operations.

If not, get in touch with us anyway! You can also give LeanSentry a try yourself. We are always just an IM away!

Best,
The LeanSentry Team

LeanSentry at TechEd 2013: Day 1

TechEd is awesome! Its our first major conference, and so far the reception has been great. You can really tell that LeanSentry is addressing a major pain point for pretty much everyone running the IIS/ASP.NET application stack.

TechEd is definitely more of an enterprise crowd, with attendees ranging from midsize companies to the likes of Deloitte and Verizon. However, they face many of the same problems that we see in small businesses and startups. Turns out production troubleshooting is a great equalizer 🙂

The LeanSentry TechEd booth

Things you loved!

It’s been great to get some face-to-face feedback about LeanSentry. Here are a few of the highlights that everyone absolutely loved:

1. IIS hang and crash diagnostics. This was literally jaw-dropping for some. We asked if debugging hangs in production was a problem, and you could just see the pain in people’s eyes. The best response we got was “Its the difference between a good day and a bad day”.

People just could not believe that LeanSentry could diagnose a hang automatically, and get them right to the source of the hang in a few clicks.

2. Lightweight monitoring, with no profilers / nothing to install on the production servers. This was a huge hit. It was clear that you appreciated non-intrusive monitoring that doesnt slow down your applications with a profiler.

And of course, everyone loved the LeanSentry Robot! We’ve had attendees say that it was the best t-shirt at the conference. If you didn’t get the shirt at the booth, email us and we may be able to mail you one.

Things you wanted

We’ve also gotten a good sense for what people want to see from LeanSentry. The big one was a self-hosted version of LeanSentry that can be deployed in environments compliant with PCI, HIPAA, and defense contractor requirements. We heard you loud and clear on that, and we can say that a version of self-hosted LeanSentry is in the works.

If you want to use the self-hosted version of LeanSentry, email us and we can discuss the timeframe further.

TechEd continues, so if you are there be sure to come by booth 2417 today and check us out.

You can also see all of our new features live in our demo app. See it here and sign up for the free trial!

Best,
The LeanSentry Team